KnightBlog

The blog of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

  • Some alt text
    Journalism

    Learning through making: 16 projects receive support to test ideas through Knight Prototype Fund

    July 17, 2014, 9 a.m., Posted by Chris Barr

    Photo: Analyzing geodata. Credit: (cc) Kris Krüg on Flickr.

    Often, when evaluating ideas for our Prototype Fund we ask ourselves and our reviewers to consider, “What might we learn from this project?” That simple question combined with an eagerness to accelerate new solutions to information challenges energizes us to embrace experimentation as a pathway to learning.

    The Prototype Fund offers small teams with an early-stage idea the opportunity to build key components of their project to test a critical hypothesis. While six months and a $35,000 grant might not always be enough to finish version one of a project, it can go a long way towards validating an assumption, developing a minimum viable product or identifying a need to revise  an approach.

    Read full article ›

  • Some alt text
    Arts

    Ted Knighton beckons us into uncharted woods at International House

    July 17, 2014, 7:53 a.m., Posted by CSchwartz

    On a day-to-day basis we are often so jaded and hurried that we miss the beauty all around us, and even lose sight of the strangeness that is life. Thanks to Ted Knighton, we have a not-so-subtle reminder of the weird and the sublime by way of Knighton's illustrations, installations...

    Read full article ›

  • Some alt text
    Journalism

    Digital initiative to expand help for military veterans

    July 16, 2014, 5 p.m., Posted by Fernando González

    Above: IAVA-organized 'Storm the Hill' day in Washington, D.C. Credit: IAVA on Flickr.

    The numbers in the scandal over the delays in health care and other benefits incurred by the Department of Veterans Affairs were shocking. As of June 2013, returning veterans trying to get help for medical issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, had to wait an average of 336 days, according to Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), the largest nonprofit organization for post-9/11 veterans and their families. The wait was almost triple the VA’s stated goal of 125 days. By March 2013, the so-called “backlog,” the number of veterans waiting to access benefits, had reached 611,000. But numbers never tell the whole story.

    To help put names and faces to the real suffering brought about by these delays, in 2012 Knight Foundation committed $250,000 to IAVA to support the development of The Wait We Carry.

    The site is an interactive visualization tool of the wait times many veterans have been enduring but also a means to learn about each veteran affected and connect with them. (Each entry has “Learn more about this veteran” and  “I want to connect with this vet about his experience” links.)

    Read full article ›