KnightBlog

The blog of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

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    Arts

    A new show at MN Museum of American Art puts individual faces and stories to life on the Green Line

    Aug. 20, 2014, 1:11 p.m., Posted by sschouweiler

    Wing Young Huie, "Ashley Hanson in Bus Stop Theater, from Creative CityMaking," 2013, digital print. There’s been so much focus on the new Twin Cities light rail Green Line, itself, since its launch earlier this summer, it’s welcome to see close attention paid to the individual...

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    Arts

    Legendary music artist David Sanborn coming to Akron Civic Theatre

    Aug. 20, 2014, 1:02 p.m., Posted by rdurbin

    David Sanborn is coming to the Akron Civic Theatre, a Knight Arts grantee. Now that’s a big deal, for Sanborn is not only a prolific saxophonist, but has a seeming legion of awards. During his lengthy career, 69-year old Sanborn has put out 24 albums of his music. He’s won...

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    Journalism

    What open data can tell us about depression

    Aug. 20, 2014, 10:30 a.m., Posted by Bob Filbin

    Bob Filbin is the chief data scientist at Crisis Text Line, a winner of Knight News Challenge: Health.

    Every day, thousands of teens face bullying, abuse and family conflicts. Many struggle with depression, self-harm or even thoughts of suicide. Launched in August 2013, Crisis Text Line offers free, 24/7 text support to teens nationwide. Since then, teens have exchanged over 3 million messages with trained specialists about the crises they face.

    Crisis Text Line is the largest service for teens on the medium they use and trust the most: texting. Many teens who use Crisis Text Line are seeking crisis support for the first time. Others tell us they’ve tried other services that offer phone support or online chat, but they prefer texting. This means Crisis Text Line is collecting unprecedented data on the crises teens face.

    One way Crisis Text Line uses its data is to help provide the best possible experience to teens who use our service. For example, we can see when teens struggle the most with anxiety (7 a.m. during the school week), and schedule specialists to help them accordingly. But we also recognize our data, in the hands of citizens and journalists, has the potential to prevent crises from happening. That’s why Crisis Text Line developed Crisis Trends. Using data from specialist reports, Crisis Trends empowers journalists, researchers and citizens to identify trends in how teens experience crises over time and by state.

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