Knight Blog

The blog of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Jamieson: Biggest threat to elections is the microtargeting of deceptive ads

Oct. 28, 2011, 10:54 a.m., Posted by Elise Hu

Today, Knight Foundation is gathering a group of media thought leaders for a discussion about new ways for people to participate in elections through digital tools and content. Follow the conversation via #knightelect.

To kick off Knight’s summit on rethinking election coverage, the head of factcheck.org, Annenberg Public Policy Center’s Kathleen Hall Jamieson, sounded a warning: “We are Tom Cruise,” she said. Let me explain.

In a memorable scene from the Tom Cruise film, Minority Report, everywhere Cruise’s character walks, personalized ads move with him, call out his name, and sell products to him as he makes his way down a mall walkway.

 

How journalists, technologists and thinkers are rethinking campaign coverage

Oct. 28, 2011, 8:58 a.m., Posted by Elise Hu

Today, Knight Foundation is gathering a group of media thought leaders for a discussion about new ways for people to participate in elections through digital tools and content. Follow the conversation via #knightelect.

Just as technology and social media are getting credit for aiding democratic movements across the Mideast, millions of Americans remain disengaged in the civic issues that touch their lives. For the voters who are paying attention, the polarization that dominates American politics has eroded trust in media organizations, leading to questions about how truly informed the public is in today’s stratified media landscape. So this week, Knight Foundation has called together technologists, academics and journalists to briefly stop, collaborate and listen (as Vanilla Ice would say).

Waldman: The FCC's important step forward on media disclosure

Oct. 27, 2011, 3:02 p.m., Posted by Steven Waldman

Earlier this month, Knight Foundation announced several new efforts to help ensure that important public policy recommendations in the FCC's Information Needs report become fully realized. Included was the appointment of Steven Waldman, the report's lead author, as a senior media policy scholar at Columbia University.

Today, Waldman writes about other exciting developments regarding the report.

Steven Waldman: The FCC today took two important steps on the recommendations in our Information Needs of Community report.  First, it approved a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking – its way of making an official regulatory proposal – to take the current “public inspection file” online.  The public file is full of material broadcasters are required to disclose as part of their public interest obligations to communities. But it is on paper, sitting in a filing cabinet, where the public can only “inspect” it by going to the station offices. Almost no one does. Suffice it to say, in an Internet era this makes no sense.