Articles by

Robertson.Adams

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    The Stomp percussion exhibit at the Young at Art Children's Museum. The ambitious and extraordinary Young At Art Children's Museum is about to be a hot summer ticket for South Florida families with kids. The cavernous and bright building is a riot of bright color and art at every turn, yet clearly organized with space for quiet time too. Art is organized into themed areas for everything from surrealism (René Magritte) to street art (Keith Haring).  Young At Art will be offering day camps as well as summer camps that include ceramics, painting and other diversions for kids. Based on my own price-shopping of summer camps in the area, their summer camp weekly rate is quite affordable.  I visited Young At Art with my daughter - who's five, attends kindergarten and has taken some art classes. She was most interested in the Stomp percussion room, the Hokusai wave climbing sculpture, and the Edouard Duval Carrie interactive art exhibit.  Carrie's installation was funded by a 2011 Knight grant and the museum itself was a Knight Arts Challenge first-year winner.   
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    Although the Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin-based nonprofit Community Foundation of South Wood County has changed its name, its mission remains the same, organization leaders said Tuesday. Incourage Community Foundation, formerly the Community Foundation of Greater South Wood County, assumed its new name Sunday — the result of a two-year process to better identify the foundation’s work […]

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    Above: Reed Hundt, former chairman, FCC and current chairman, IDEA. This post is part of "The Digital Revolution and Democracy" series. For more information on the series, read "Digital Democracy: A More Perfect Union." “In the early days of the Internet as a commercial and social phenomenon, the thought was that the Internet would be the global common medium... building a platform for the world to connect to each other," says Reed Hundt, former chairman of the FCC during the Clinton Administration. The pace in which it has connected people - 2 billion participants in 20 years - is "astounding," he said. However, as the Internet has exploded in growth, the commercial interests in it may have diverged from public interests.
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    Above: Joaquin Alvarado, Senior VP at American Public Media This post is part of "The Digital Revolution and Democracy" series. For more information on the series, read "Digital Democracy: A More Perfect Union." It's important to start asking how we can leverage digital media and social networks as a platform to improve our democracy, argues Joaquin Alvarado, the Senior Vice President for Digital Innovation for American Public Media. The formation of networks is not just a digital tech issue, but a question of how new ideas are socialized, he says.
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    Above: Paula Kerger President and CEO, PBS This post is part of the Digital Revolution and Democracy series, which offers idea-inspiring interviews with thought leaders who are shaping the future of media and democracy. More at knightfoundation.org/focas. This year has been a complicated one for PBS, as federal funding was nearly cut off entirely for the 41-year-old nonprofit broadcasting institution, says President and CEO Paula Kerger (@paulakerger on Twitter).   "Government funding is very important if you care about access, and making sure that all Americans have the ability to see public broadcasting content," Kerger said.  She credited an outreach campaign on behalf of PBS for successfully preserving its funding.
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    Graham Richard, President, Graham Richard Assoc. LLC and former mayor, Fort Wayne, Ind. This interview is part of the Digital Revolution and Democracy series, which offers idea-inspiring interviews with thought leaders who are shaping the future of media and democracy. More at knightfoundation.org/focas. Innovative use of the Internet can help local governments provide quick, agile, smart services – and not just to a limited part of the population, says former Fort Wayne Mayor Graham Richard. He spoke with Knight Foundation Vice President Dennis Scholl about opportunities for using technology to better serve communities while attending the Aspen Institute Forum on Communications and Society (FOCAS). Richard says citizens are used to going online and getting customer service from institutions, and as a result local governments must become more responsive. He thinks citizens today are more able to fully engage with the local government officials, and demand change by using the power of social media.
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    Daniel Weitzner, Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Internet Policy, The White House This post is one in the series, "The Digital Revolution & Democracy." On President Obama's first day in office, he promised that "transparency and rule of law will be the touchstones of this presidency." Keeping up with the demand for this transparency is an immense task, and Deputy Chief Technology Officer Danny Weitzner is the person in the breech.