Articles by

Robertson.Adams

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    Steven Clift, Founder and Executive Director, E-Democracy.org This post is part of "The Digital Revolution and Democracy" series. For more information on the series, read "Digital Democracy: A More Perfect Union". What technology is used to influence the media, the public and democracy? What tools will people use to defend against propaganda and find content that can help them navigate and manage their community? And will people be powerless against high-tech manipulation? "You have to realize that when you roll up your sleeves, you can shape democracy," says Steven Clift, founder and executive director of E-Democracy.org and an online strategist focused on the use of the Internet in democracy, governance and community. "It isn’t just about using the technologies neutrally, though, you have to use them with intent," he says. "People can have a voice, people can solve problems. Governments can provide more information. But unless people bring their democratic intent to it, it doesn’t measure up." Knight Foundation's interview with Clift is the first of 17 to be published on KnightBlog as part of "The Digital Revolution and Democracy," a series of idea-inspiring videos that examine the ever-evolving trends transforming our lives. From the Arab Spring to the Digital Divide, from the promise to the peril of these new tools, we talk with thought leaders who are shaping the future of media and democracy. Follow along as foundation Vice President Dennis Scholl interviews 17 leaders who believe passionately in self-government -- but have different visions of how it will evolve.
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    NEWS RELEASE | FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 6, 2011) Knight Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) today are launching an eight-city competition seeking new models for local arts journalism in the digital age. The initiative seeks to rethink how traditional media systems function, harnessing the...
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    Fourteen University of Miami multimedia graduate students teamed with students from seven Knight Center for International Media partner schools in Africa and Asia to tell stories that attempt to personalize the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Working with Tom Kennedy, Knight Center Professional-in-Residence, each team found personal local stories that shed light and insight on critical global issues, including poverty, maternal health, environmental sustainability, universal education, gender equality, HIV AIDS and children's health.