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    The Investigative Reporters and Editors annual conference brings together hundreds of journalists committed to sharing best practices around investigative reporting and data journalism. Together they work to address issues from access to public records to producing accountability reporting, exploring new opportunities and challenges in the digital age. Knight Foundation will join everyone in Phoenix to take part in workshops, panels and discussions about the role of journalism in an increasingly complex media environment. Take a look at these events to connect with Knight and our network of partners and grantees at IRE 2017.
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    Magic Leap still hasn’t released a product. But the dream world it’s creating keeps getting richer and richer.Magic Leap founder and CEO Rony Abovitz spoke this week at the eMerge Americas conference on Miami Beach, joining Jean-Pierre Bardet, dean of University of Miami’s College of Engineering, on a panel moderated by Knight Foundation’s Miami program director, Matt Haggman.Virtual reality and augmented reality, he suggested, are just gateway technologies to the experience the secretive South Florida company is building.
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    A shortlist of media innovations with potentially long reach, spotlighted during the 2017 Personal Democracy Forum, included an upcoming news site whose subscribers will help dictate what’s covered and a planned strategic expansion of Native American efforts to shape headlines about their concerns.Hosted by Civic Hall, the New York conference drew a global roster of artists, activists, politicians, journalists, technologists and other change-makers bent on enlarging the public discourse and public understanding of the mother lode of information online and elsewhere. This, the conferees said, at a time when disinformation is deliberately spread and often unchecked.
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    Watch the 2017 Personal Democracy Forum live stream.Over the past few months we’ve seen a surge in civic activism in communities across America. From the history-making women’s march to the march for science, ordinary people have begun to get more involved in attempting to shape the policies and decisions that affect their lives. This year, Knight Foundation is sponsoring the Personal Democracy Forum as it explores how we can strengthen our democratic institutions and civic life.This annual conference will bring together civic leaders, technologists, journalists, and others to discuss society’s most pressing issues. Speakers such as New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, net neutrality expert Tim Wu, and other civic leaders will take to the stage this year. Broad topic areas being explored include civic technology, ideas and provocations, media Innovation, and grassroots and digital organizing. 
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    Today we are announcing $1.87 million in support to 12 art museums to explore new ways technology can connect people to art.These days, technology and digital communications permeate almost every corner of our lives, from the time we scroll through the morning’s newsfeed until we set an alarm on our phone to wake up the next day. As a result, cultural organizations are being challenged to respond to new audience expectations and behaviors brought about by an always-connected society. On the flip side of these challenges is real opportunity, for museums to use digital means to reach visitors beyond the walls of their institution, to delight people in new ways and to create tools that help researchers.
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    Adnan Mahmud is CEO of LiveStories, a data storytelling platform for the public sector, which is also a portfolio company of the Knight Enterprise Fund. Data is everywhere. We constantly hear about data on the news, and countless data sets are available on the internet. The amount of data produced by governments and businesses seems to grow exponentially every year.But the tools to explore data have only improved incrementally. Every software tool has been built for data analysts. Most people simply can’t use the vast amounts of available data in any meaningful way.
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    Knight Foundation has made significant investments in vibrant public spaces and places that can bring people in communities together. So it was hard not to take notice last summer when image and after image popped up on our Twitter feeds showing crowds of people—around the world—swarming public places at all hours. As we quickly learned, they were playing Pokémon GO, a location-based, augmented-reality game made by the Silicon Valley firm Niantic, Inc.The premise of the game is simple—find and catch as many Pokémon (cute, cartoonish creatures) as you can. But the technology underneath may presage an important new phase of our digital future.
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    Last week over 150 people gathered at New York Public Library to participate in the NetGain conference, an initiative supported by five foundations (Ford, MacArthur, Knight, Open Society Foundations, and Mozilla) to explore the challenges and opportunities of the digital age. Foundation presidents as well as civic and industry leaders gathered to discuss the opportunities and risks associated with the expansion of Internet of Things (IoT) technology.  The panels addressed issues of privacy, security, and equity in IoT, topics that have been the focus of foundation grants made in support of the NetGain initiative. At the event, Knight announced $1.2 million in support of IoT planning grants to six cities: Akron, Ohio; Boston, Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia, and San Jose, California.Several themes emerged throughout the day.
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    This post originally appeared on Pop Up Archive's Audiosear.ch blog.In 2014, our co-founders — Anne Wootton and Bailey Smith — were very, very busy.Every day they were commuting from Oakland, CA to 500 Startups’ Mountain View accelerator  as they developed Pop Up Archive, a business then in its infancy. They spent their days learning about speech-to-text software and ways of modeling data for audio, pitching their vision that audio was a medium whose parity with text was becoming inevitable. They talked about developing a product that was like Google for all types of audio. Then the podcast “Serial” was released.
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    This post is third in a series about a gathering of library directors Knight Foundation convened in Miami Feb. 11-12, 2017, as part of its continuing work with libraries. Knight Foundation also recently released a report “Developing Clarity: Innovating in Library Systems,” and announced a package of funding to support innovation in libraries. Brian Bannon opened with a succinct and pointed question:“How many people have done library renovation in the last five years?” he asked. “And in the last two years?”As hands shot up on the afternoon of the second day of Knight Foundation’s library directors’ meeting, on Feb. 12, the mini-panel “Libraries as a Civic Space” got off to a fast start, with Bannon, commissioner and CEO of the Chicago Public Library, and Marie Ostergaard, head of community engagement, partnerships and communication for Dokk1 in Aarhus, Denmark.“That’s a lot of people,” Bannon said, looking out over the group of 40 directors. “How many people have one coming up on some level in the next two years?”
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    The Internet of Things (IoT) describes a connected world in which humans, machines and infrastructure are in constant communication with each other. As we move towards a reality in which vast amounts of data are being collected and transmitted about the world around us, how will this shape cities and public life? What are the implications for privacy and security? What are the possibilities and risks presented by this new technology?On April 21, we will convene foundation presidents and civic and industry leaders to discuss the emerging field of IoT. Through a series of thought-provoking panel discussions, we will explore public interest issues surrounding the IoT, including topics such as: How should we be thinking about public education and consumer advocacy? And how are cities thinking of leveraging sensor-based technology to improve services?
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    Susan Crawford is a professor at Harvard Law School.Big data is driving business decisions, mobile devices keep us constantly connected, and social media is transforming the nature of politics. But when it comes to cities, no technology has captured the imagination of urban planners, city officials, and startups worldwide more than the Internet of Things (IoT). With low-power, low-cost devices, we can connect almost any object to the internet. We can use these devices to create a vast web of sensors—from wearables to Wi-Fi kiosks to futuristic trash cans—to collect and share data.With IoT, cities can integrate, analyze, and visualize diverse information. Cities can discover new insights; imagine examining patterns of transit demand in relation to air quality or citywide energy use, or understanding the walkability of a city in relation to pedestrian congestion and storefront width. IoT can also reduce costs by enabling simple efficiencies: Trash can be collected only when receptacles are full and public parks can be watered only when the ground is dry. But these new capabilities bring new challenges for city officials. Who will pay for the infrastructure? Who will own the data? And how can the public ensure that citizens’ privacy and security are protected?
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    Thank you to everyone who participated in the open call for ideas to combat misinformation on the web and bolster trust in quality journalism. We received more than 800 applications from a range of organizations and individuals. Their projects seek to experiment and test news ways for improving the flow of accurate information.Over the coming weeks, we’ll review applications with the help of outside judges, who were selected for their expertise in the fields of media and civic engagement. Our first step in the process is reviewing all of the applications to eliminate any that are off-topic. Once that’s done, we’ll move on to the first round of reviews. We’ve assembled a group of 24 judges who will read through applications and evaluate the quality of the idea and strength of the team. Then, we’ll narrow the pool of applications to about 50 semifinalists. We will notify everyone on April 19 whether or not they advance to the next round. 
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    This post is second in a series about a gathering of library directors Knight Foundation convened in Miami Feb. 11-12, 2017, as part of its continuing work with libraries. Knight Foundation also recently released a report “Developing Clarity: Innovating in Library Systems,” and announced a package of funding to support innovation in libraries. The second day of the Knight Foundation’s library directors’ meeting, on Feb. 12, began with “Making Innovation Happen in a Constrained Environment,” a mini-panel featuring Melanie Huggins, executive director of the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina, and Story Bellows, chief innovation and performance officer of the Brooklyn Public Library.
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    This post is one in a series about a gathering of library directors Knight Foundation convened in Miami Feb. 11-12, 2017, as part of its continuing work with libraries. Today, Knight Foundation is also releasing a report “Developing Clarity: Innovating in Library Systems,” and announcing a package of funding to support innovation in libraries. The biggest challenges facing library organizations, according to Knight Foundation survey data, are funding, staff time, resources…and lack of resources.      They all affect what libraries can do, what choices they can make to be more effective, and the way they pursue innovation.